Tag Archives: Mozambique

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Mozambique: Maxixe Residents Complain of Water Shortages

Maxixe — Residents of Bembe, an outlying neighbourhood of the city of Maxixe, in the southern Mozambican province of Inhambane, on Tuesday complained to President Armando Guebuza that they are facing a growing shortage of clean drinking water.

At a message presented at a rally addressed by Guebuza, as part of his “Open and Inclusive Presidency” in Inhambane, they said the situation is particularly worrying in the areas of Maquetela and Habana.

Jaime Simoes, who read the message, said that Maquetela has only two sources of drinking water for 1,226 inhabitants, while in Habana, with 2,113 inhabitants, the piped water supply only reaches a few houses.

He was supported by Ana Berta, who went to the podium to tell Guebuza that, in some cases, the water drunk by livestock is the same as that consumed by Bembe residents.

A further complaint raised was that Maquetela is still not on the electricity grid, but other neighbourhoods, further away from the centre of Maxixe, do have electricity. “We are twins. Why does the other part deserve greater attention?”, asked one resident.

Despite these difficulties, Guebuza praised the population of Maxixe for the value they put on peace, and for their general happy and confident attitude.

“Happiness helps make peace more solid”, he said. “In places where there is no happiness, nobody feels at ease, because people aren’t at peace with themselves”.

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Mozambique: Government Looking for Funding for Mapai Dam

Maputo — Mozambican President Armando Guebuza pledged on Saturday that the government will continue to seek funding for a dam at Mapai, in the southern province of Gaza, that will help control the flow of the Limpopo river.

The Mapai dam has been projected for many years. It is regarded as of vital importance for mitigating the impact of flooding in the Limpopo valley.

In the floods of last January, at least 47 people died in the Limpopo valley, and the entire city of Chókwè was submerged.

“It is crucial that we have a dam at Mapai”, said Guebuza, at a press conference in the town of Macia marking the end of his “Open and Inclusive Presidency” in Gaza. “The problem is not that we lack the will, or that there is no blueprint for a dam. The problem is much more that of money”.

“The government will not cease looking for sources of finance so that the dam is built”, he stressed. It was also key, he added, to repair the dykes that were breached during the January floods. This work has already begun, said the President.

Guebuza noted that, despite the damage caused by the floods, the people of Gaza had rolled up their sleeves, and resumed their normal social and economic activities. “A short while ago, this area suffered major flooding, but it has stood up again as if nothing had happened”.

He said he had also been impressed by the enthusiasm shown at the rallies he had addressed. The people, he argued, showed they understand that the government is attempting to pull them from poverty, and that they too have a role to play in this effort.

Useful proposals had been made. Thus at a rally in Machaila locality, in Chigubo district, residents had proposed that the local population itself should inspect building works, particularly on roads, which are often built without any quality. “We shall think about this”, promised the President.

For Guebuza, Mozambicans should take over ownership of development processes, influence decisions and supervise their implementation. “When the people reach this level, we shall have a Mozambique that is not running, but flying’, he declared.

Guebuza also stressed the importance of self-esteem. People should feel “they they must not be ashamed of liking themselves and liking what they do”.

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NEPAD Water CoE’s Country Water Resource Profiles

Mozambique Country Water Resource ProfileFor the first time, the NEPAD Water CoEs CWRPs combine the various physical hydrology [water resource and its exploitation], with a look at the service associated with water delivery [infrastructure], the social setting of the nation and how the management of water in terms of allocation and distribution works in the respective countries and to some extent its international obligations and relationships related to shared water resources.  It also identifies the education resources and institutions in the water sector. The objective is to initially create the CWRPs for all Southern African Countries, from where the other African Countries will be developed.

You can download the NEPAD Water CoE’s CWRPs for:

We are also in the process of finalising the NEPAD Water CoE’s CWRPs for the following countries, and will be available soon.

  • South Africa
  • Botswana
  • Zambia
  • Malawi

Mozambique: Expansion of Public Water Network in Greater Maputo

Maputo — The Mozambican government has promised that it will continue to work with private operators to supply water to people not yet covered by the public water network.

The Minister of Public Works, Cadmiel Muthemba, made this promise on Friday, as he visited areas on the outskirts of Maputo where the government is connecting more households to the public network.

Last month, private water suppliers briefly disconnected their clients in pursuit of demands for massive compensation from the government. They were demanding around 500 million UIS dollars to compensate for loss of clients to the public sector, and for damage to pipes during the extension of the public network.

The private suppliers ended their strike after less than two days, when angry consumers pointed out that the suppliers were violating the contracts they had signed.

That incident has not halted the government’s drive to expand the public network in the Greater Maputo area. The network is expanding into areas which have traditionally been supplied by the private operators.

Muthemba was looking at progress on an emergency programme to drill a further 11 boreholes in areas not yet served by the public network. He guaranteed that there would still be private management of water supply, as envisaged in the government’s programe.

“We shall continue to work with the private sector in water supply”, he told reporters. The new boreholes would be farmed out to private management, just as other systems owned by the government’s Water Supply Assets and Investment fund (FIPAG) are currently being managed by private businesses.

The 11 boreholes are being built in parts of Maputo and Matola cities, and the neighbouring district of Marracuene – namely in the neighbourhoods of Ndlavela, Zimpeto, Guava, Mateque, Samora Machel, Magoanine A and C, 1st May and Kilometre 15.

The emergency programme also involves reactivating abandoned public standpipes.

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Mozambique: World Bank Approves Funds for Maputo Water Supply

Maputo — The Executive Board of the World Bank on Thursday approved a loan of 178 million US dollars to the Mozambican government. This will fund the expansion of the water supply in the Maputo metropolis.

The Greater Maputo Water Supply Expansion Project will connect a hundred thousand families to the water supply system.

Under the project, a new water treatment plant with a capacity of 60,000 cubic metres per day will draw water from the Corumana dam on the Sabie River. In addition, 93 kilometres of new pipeline will be able to transport 120,000 cubic metres of water per day. The plan also includes the construction of reservoirs, pumping stations, and ancillary works.

According to the World Bank’s country director for Mozambique, Laurence Clarke, “the government of Mozambique has made steady progress in building a sustainable water system to provide access to clean water for many households in its quickly growing urban areas”.

The project will also tackle problems caused by climate change. The Bank’s Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region, Jamal Saghir, explained, “Mozambique is vulnerable to periodic tropical cyclones during the summer months that periodically flood the intake system and water treatment plant of the existent water works. This project will support the creation of a water system that is climate resilient”.

The loan will also help Mozambique meet its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The World Bank’s project team leader, Luiz Claudio Martins Tavares, pointed out, “approximately 17 per cent of under-five deaths in Mozambique are the result of diarrheal diseases, primarily caused by poor water and sanitation. The funds approved today will transport clean, treated water directly to households in the Greater Maputo Area, bringing families an opportunity for improved health, and more time in each day for busy women and girls”.

The loan will come from the World Bank’s soft loan facility, the International Development Association (IDA).

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Mozambique: World Bank Approves U.S.$178 Million to Increase Maputo Water Access

Washington — The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors today approved US$178 million IDA* credit to help the Government of Mozambique increase access to clean water for people living in Mozambique’s largest urban area – the Greater Maputo Area. The project will equally benefit women and girls who spend considerable time each day fetching water for their family.

“The government of Mozambique has made steady progress in building a sustainable water system to provide access to clean water for many households in its quickly growing urban areas,” says Laurence C. Clarke, World Bank Country Director for Mozambique. “We are happy to support this project that will bring improved health and water security to over 100,000 families living in the Greater Maputo Area.”

Today’s funds will support the Greater Maputo Water Supply Expansion Project, designed as part of the government’s recently updated National Urban Water Supply and Sanitation Strategy. The project contributes to the Government’s third Poverty Reduction Action Plan 2011-2014 (Plano de Acção para a Redução da Pobreza, PARP ); the third pillar of which seeks to improve access to, and use of water and enable access to safe sanitation, to which the project will contribute directly. The project’s works will connect approximately 100,000 households to the formal water supply system in Greater Maputo.

The project will help the government build a 60,000 m3/day water treatment plant that will draw raw water from the Corumana dam, as well as support the construction of approximately 93 kilometers of transmission pipeline, with a capacity of 120,000 m3/day of water, as well as reservoirs, pumping stations, and ancillary works.

“Mozambique is vulnerable to periodic tropical cyclones during the summer months that periodically flood the intake system and water treatment plant of the existent water works,” says Jamal Saghir, Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region. “This project will support the creation of a water system that is climate resilient and that brings clean water for drinking, cooking and cleaning for the families in the Greater Maputo Area.”

The project will also provide technical assistance to the government’s Water Supply Asset Holding and Investment Fund (Fundo de Investimento e Património do Abastecimento de Água – FIPAG) and capacity building and operational support to the independent Water Regulatory Council (Conselho de Regulação de Águas – CRA).

“Approximately 17 percent of under-five deaths in Mozambique are the result of diarrheal diseases, primarily caused by poor water and sanitation,” says Luiz Claudio Martins Tavares, Task Team Leader for the project. “The funds approved today will transport clean, treated water directly to households in the Greater Maputo Area, bringing families an opportunity for improved health, and more time in each day for busy women and girls.”

The World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA), established in 1960, helps the world’s poorest countries by providing zero-interest financing and grants for projects and programs that boost economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve poor people’s lives. IDA is one of the largest sources of assistance for the world’s 82 poorest countries, 40 of which are in Africa. Resources from IDA bring positive change for 1.8 billion people living on less than $2 a day. Between 2003 and 2013, IDA provided $256 billion in financing for 3,787 projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, benefiting on average, 36 African countries a year.

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Mozambique: Water, Drainage Investments Spur Urban Boom in Mozambique

Washington — U.S. investments in water and drainage systems in northern Mozambique, made through the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), are supporting an urban boom in the region.

The investments, part of MCC’s five-year, $507 million compact with Mozambique, are helping to expand the water delivery system in Nampula, the country’s third-largest city, MCC recently reported on its website.

The improvements are part of the compact’s $207 million Water Supply and Sanitation Project, expanding water and sanitation services in three cities, creating rural water points and building the capacity of local water institutions. More than 1.2 million people are expected to benefit from this project, which is projected to increase per capita income by almost $150 annually over 20 years.

RAISING NACALA DAM

The Nacala Dam was designed and constructed from 1968 to 1975. In 1982, the dam wall was overtopped for 10 hours because the spillway gates failed, resulting in the severe erosion of the dam’s downstream face. Repairs have been made several times since then, but considerable seepage from the concrete wall of the spillway has undermined operations.

MCC is helping to rehabilitate the dam and to raise it from 17 meters to 19 meters to help deliver water to the fast-growing region it serves. An improved water treatment plant will be able to handle 1,041 cubic meters of water per hour — more than triple the current capacity. The dam’s storage capacity will increase from 4.2 million to 6.6 million cubic meters.

Currently, Nampula has about 10 hours of water service each day; after the project, the city should have water service 24 hours a day.

ACHIEVING PROPER DRAINAGE

For Rosalinda Jose Pereira of Nampula, it’s an experience as regular as the rainy season: Storms arrive, the land floods, water stagnates, mosquitoes thrive and malaria spreads. Flooded streets can also force traffic to a standstill and send operating costs skyward.

MCC is rehabilitating and expanding the city’s drainage system to help ease street flooding, control erosion in periurban areas and improve access to drainage channels in order to clean them.

The planned improvements in Nampula include rehabilitating 0.66 kilometers of drainage galleries and 174 storm water inlets in the city; constructing 9.5 kilometers of drainage pipes and almost 1 kilometer of galleries in the city; and realigning, widening or building more than 8 kilometers of stormwater drainage open channels in the periurban area.

MCC is also funding the rehabilitation and construction of stormwater pipes, galleries and open channels in Quelimane, the largest city in Zambezia province.

For Pereira and her neighbors in Nampula, improved drainage will mean a better quality of life.

“We can only do so much by ourselves,” Pereira said. “With this project, I hope my area will be much cleaner.”

IMPROVING WATER SYSTEMS

MCC’s investments in Nampula’s water system also include constructing or rehabilitating four pumping stations and one new distribution center, expanding a treatment plant and laying 16 kilometers of transmission pipes — all with the aim of improving water quantity and pressure for 400,000 people.

Another donor-financed project has already begun expanding household hookups to Nampula’s growing neighborhoods, like the periurban area built on a mountain to the east of the city center where Carolina Fernando lives.

“I will be so happy when I can have water nearby,” said Fernando, who used to rise with the sun each morning to search for water.

Another resident of that neighborhood, Ana Albano, is also hopeful about the future. Each day, she walks about 30 minutes to a set of hand-dug wells, where she methodically lowers a jerrycan cut in half and attached to a bamboo stick into the 4.5-meter-deep hole, fills it and then transfers the contents to another jerrycan on the surface.

It’s a routine Albano performs five times a day, with each trip taking a little more than an hour. “Ever since I have been small,” she said, “I have needed to fetch water every day.”

If a water source were closer, she said, she would have more time for cleaning her house and washing clothes.

THE NACALA BOOM

About 160 kilometers east of where Fernando and Albano search for water, the Mozambican boom is underway.

The road into Nacala is lined with huge factories and is typically jammed with trucks ferrying their cargo to the deepest port in southern Africa. A new international airport is under construction, and billboards announce the intention of international hotel chains to cater to the influx of foreign business people. Container ships dot the coastline. Dozens of trucks wait in line at the city’s two concrete factories. Business signs are written in Portuguese, English, Chinese and French.

Nacala is the epicenter of northern Mozambique’s growth, and MCC contributes to this growth by providing access to a more secure water supply network by constructing a new dam on the Muecula River and by improving the city’s water supply system. Ultimately, both projects are designed to help provide water to about 220,000 people.

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Mozambique: Funds Available to Repair Massingir Dam

Maputo — Emergency repair work to the Massingir Dam will improve irrigation for 16,000 farmers in the districts of Xai-Xai, Chokwe and Massingir in the southern Mozambican province of Gaza.

Xai-Xai and Chokwe have a huge potential for food production, including vegetables, rice, and livestock.

However, damage to the dam in May 2008 reduced the volume of water that could safely be stored.

In fact, the dam had never been fully operational as leaks appeared within months of the end of construction in 1977. Major repairs in 2007 were botched and within a year the bottom outlet pipes burst.

As a result, the area has suffered from water shortages. According to the daily newspaper “Noticias”, the leaks have also contributed to sedimentation in the reservoir, affecting 600 fishermen.

Funding for the emergency repair work is now available through a 33 million US dollar credit from the African Development Bank (AfDB), agreed at the end of May. On Tuesday, the Mozambican cabinet (Council of Ministers) approved the loan.

The dam on the Elephants River – a major tributary of the Limpopo – plays an important role in regulating downstream water levels. The repaired dam will reduce the possibility of a repeat of the destruction caused by flooding in Chokwe and Xai-Xai earlier this year.

The Council of Ministers also approved a 217 million dollar credit line from the Exim Bank of India for infrastructure projects.

Under the credit facility, 150 million dollars will be made available to fund the rebuilding of the highway between Tica, Buzi and Nova Sofala in the central province of Sofala; 47 million dollars will be used in constructing 1,200 houses in the provinces of Tete, Zambezia and Cabo Delgado; and 20 million dollars will finance the third phase of the rural water supply project in the provinces of Manica, Zambezia and Nampula.

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Mozambique: Government Terminates Nacala Water Treatment Contract

Maputo — The Mozambican government has terminated a contract with the Indian consortium Tecnofab-Goon for its failure to construct a new water treatment plant in the northern city of Nacala.

According to the Minister of Planning and Development, Aiuba Cuereneia, the action was taken because the work must be completed in September under the conditions of the funding from the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA).

Cuereneia pointed out that the technical staff are ready and all the equipment and materials are available. He therefore saw no justification for the delay in the 18 million US dollar project.

Cited in the daily newspaper “Noticias”, the Minister stated, “we have held various meetings with the company to review the deadline. But unfortunately they have shown themselves to be incapable and we now have no alternative but to hire another company”.

The plant will treat 25,000 cubic metres of water per day for the city of Nacala and the town of Nacala-a-Velha.

The United States government, through the MCA, has made 506.9 million dollars available to support the Mozambican government’s development strategy in the provinces of Cabo Delgado, Nampula, Niassa and Zambezia.

Completing the projects on schedule is a key condition for Mozambique to become eligible for a second MCA “compact”. Therefore, all work must stop by 22 September 2013 and the MCA has warned that it will not pay for any work carried out after that date.

Several projects funded by the MCA have been finished, including the rehabilitation and expansion of the Nacala dam and the construction of 30 kilometres of water pipeline to Nacala city.

According to the Executive Director of MCA-Mozambique, Paulo Fumane, the remaining projects are on target to be completed on time.

The MCA has funded the Land Tenure Services Project, which has secured land titles for 140,000 people. It also funded the Rural Water Project, which constructed over six hundred water points benefitting more than 300,000 people.

It has financed improved drainage for the cities of Nampula and Quelimane and the rehabilitation of the stretches of highway between Rio Ligonha and Nampula, and Namialo and Rio Lurio.

The MCA also financed the Farmer Income Support Project, which has helped over 277,000 farmers hit by coconut lethal yellowing disease. Six hundred thousand infected coconut trees were cleared and replaced by more than 780,000 seedlings.

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Mozambique: Private Water Suppliers Retreat

Maputo — The strike by Mozambique’s private water suppliers, who are demanding huge sums in “compensation” from the government, lasted for less than two days.

By Friday afternoon, according to a report in the Maputo daily “Noticias”, the suppliers had turned the taps back on and the water from privately owned wells and boreholes was flowing again.

The suppliers said they had ended their strike out of respect for their clients. The chairperson of the Association of Mozambican Water Suppliers (AFORAMO), Paulino Cossa, said the suppliers had relented because, despite the suspension of service, the consumers had been paying their bills, and signing contracts.

But the bills were paid and contracts were signed before the taps were turned off on Thursday morning. What happened immediately on Thursday was that infuriated consumers pointed out that the suppliers were violating the contracts they had signed. Consumers threatened to sue the suppliers and to stage demonstrations outside their offices.

Cossa threatened “intermittent” suspensions of supplies in the future.

Thus next month the taps will be turned off for another two days, a month later the cut will be for three days and so on. This remains a violation of the contracts between the suppliers and their consumers.

Cossa claimed that the government shows “total disrespect” for the investments made by the private suppliers. What he meant was that the private suppliers are losing clients to the public water network.

This was entirely predictable: the government has made no secret of its determination to improve the coverage of the public network. This pledge is in the government’s five year programme, and in the annual Economic and Social Plans. Massive investments have been made in expanding the network in Maputo and the neighbouring city of Matola.

The total claim from AFORAMO for losses of clients and future profits, and damage to its piping when public pipes are laid, amounts to around 500 million US dollar. The Ministry of Public Works says hat paying such sums is out of the question.

An advisor to the Minister, Joaquim Cossa, reacting to the resumption of supplies, said it was predictable, because the private suppliers were in reality waging war against their own clients and not the government.

He said the suppliers’ behaviour was incomprehensible, since AFORAMO and the government were still negotiating over the compensation issue.

Cossa stressed that the expension of the public water network will continue, and it is up to consumers to decide whether they want to buy their water from private or public suppliers.

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